National News

 

Gun Lobby Scores Big Victory in North Carolina

Gun Lobby Scores Big Victory in North Carolina

For years, police officers in North Carolina had a choice when it came to confiscated guns. They could use them for law enforcement purposes—training, testing, examining—or they could destroy them.

But a new law (PDF) passed by Republican lawmakers in the state changes that. Police officers can still use confiscated guns, but as of this week, they can’t destroy them. Instead, if a department wants to get rid of a gun, it has to sell it or auction it. Effectively, men and women who once worked to keep guns off of the streets must now moonlight as gun dealers.

Crafted by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and passed at the urging of the National Rifle Association, the specifics of the “Save the Gun” law are straightforward. When faced with confiscated guns, law enforcement agencies must either donate, keep, or sell the items to licensed firearm dealers. The only guns that can legally be destroyed are those that are damaged or missing serial numbers, the latter an indication the gun was stolen. (In practical terms, that group doesn’t add up to many weapons; nationwide, stolen guns account for just 10 to 15 percent of those used in crimes.)

As for what law enforcement thinks? After ALEC developed this proposal in 2011, the Fraternal Order of the Police, a national labor union, said that it preferred discretion when it came to dealing with confiscated weapons—a reasonable position. In North Carolina, the Sheriff’s Association, a trade group, declined to comment on the measure while it faced debate in the legislature. Still, it’s hard to imagine that local police are happy with a law that not only limits their options but also blocks judges from ordering the destruction of weapons used in a crime. Indeed, there’s something perverse about forcing a police department to sell guns that may have been used for assault or murder.

There’s a big question hanging over all of this: why—besides their commitment to every right-wing priority under the sun—would North Carolina Republicans push this kind of law? In praising the proposal as “fiscally responsible,” one co-sponsor suggested that money was the main reason—that it would be a way for police departments to fund themselves. In which case, why forbid law enforcement from destroying guns? Why not give them the choice? That’s the approach Texas tookthis summer, with a law that allows police departments to sell confiscated weapons but doesn’t require them to do so.

Read The Full Article On The Daily Beast

More articles from The Daily Beast:

© 2013 Newsweek/Daily Beast Company LLC

 

More Articles

 

HOT 105.7 Montgomery's #1 Station for Hip Hop is an iHeartRadio Station

© 2014 iHeartMedia, Inc.

*